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    DIY Portal

    Remote Wire Turn-On Issues?

    Remote Wire Turn-On Issues?

    Ever heard that loud THUMP from your subs when you turn on your radio?  Ever had your amplifier soft-protect in the middle of BANGIN?  Your issues could all stem from your remote turn-on lead from the head unit.  Often times the first thing we look at when attempting to self diagnose these types of issues is either loose connections, or loss of power.  Often times that little remote turn-on wire can ultimately be the culprit.  
    The remote turn-on wire from the radio carries a relatively small amount of DC current through it, and in a situation where multiple amplifiers, crossovers, sound processors and other 12v devices are being used, they may starve for the current needed to keep them running at peak potential, having to split the available current in so many directions.
    And also, in amplifiers without soft turn-on circuitry, you may even experience a loud thump coming from your speakers upon system initialization.  This, while typically not damaging to your equipment, may be an embarrassing nuisance when others are within earshot. 
    The solution to both of these problems, pending they are your culprit of course, is a Soft Turn-On Relay Installation.  This is a very simple procedure involving a single 30a 12v relay that obtains turn-on signal from either your head unit or another trusted 12v ignition source, and allows an outbound signal to be produced with a higher current availability to keep your devices running and running stronger!  It also helps avoid hearing that pesky thump on start-up!
    Check out the wiring diagram below for a simple installation technique used by the pro's, and CLICK HERE if you'd like to pick a couple up and Do It Yourself for pennies on the dollar!

     

    Watts Your Amplifier's Output?

    Watts Your Amplifier's Output?

    Calculate Wattage:  Clamped Output in Amps x Measured Output Voltage
    Click this LINK to learn the proper way to clamp your amplifier(s) to see REAL LIFE power output!  Grab your Clamp Meter & Multi-Meter and let's go!

    What Is Box Rise?

    What Is Box Rise?

    Just because your amp produces x-watts at 1 ohm, and you are presenting it with a 1 Ohm load, it doesn't always mean your output will be x-watts.  Check out THIS short article from the folks at A-Trend for a more concise explanation of "Box Rise" before you buy your next amplifier.

    What's The Big Deal About The Big 3?

    What's The Big Deal About The Big 3?

    What in the world is a Big3 Upgrade and is it right for you?  Simple answer, a Big3 Upgrade is basically an electrical stress reliever for your vehicle's charging system, so yes it is very beneficial, and sometimes even necessary!  Comprised of a series of wire gauge upgrades under the hood, the Big3 Lessens the burden placed on stock wiring, and allows all your 12 volt accessories to function better by lessening the risk of electrical inefficiency.  A typical Big3 installation consists of an upgraded power wire between the alternator's charging post and the stock position battery's positive terminal, a Ground wire upgrade from the alternator bracket or engine block to a frame point, and another Ground upgrade from the stock position battery's ground post to a frame point.  These 3 short runs of wire make a tremendous difference when improving the overall electrical health of your car audio system.   Click HERE to view our selection of Big3 Kits for sale, and don't forget to check out our how-to VIDEO to see how easy it is to perform your very own Big3 installation.  OR check out the cool video below from the folks over at Sonic Electronics and learn how right now!

    Hi, Current!

    Hi, Current!

    So what's the big deal with your stock alternator?  NOTHING AT ALL.  When installing aftermarket 12 volt equipment in your ride, the heart of the system becomes less efficient at supplying those devices with adequate 12 volt current to allow for optimum performance.  An OEM alternator averages a peak supply potential of 120 amps.  Some vehicle's stock electrical devices pull as much as 100 amps of current, leaving the alternator onlly a small amount of leftover current to throw at your brand new 5,000 watt amplifier that needs over 400 amps of current.  The math doesn't seem to work well, does it?  Too many consumers leave so much power on the table by forgetting to feed their amplifiers and other 12 volt devices the current they so strongly crave.  Remember, operation and performance are two different things.  Feed your system with higher current by clicking HERE to examine our selection of High Output Alternators courtesy of G2 Power!